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Comments (139)
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74
giglamesh 74 points ago +74 / -0

No matter where the ports are, EAST, WEST, or SOUTH, if the Trucks aren't moving the goods, it doesn't matter how fast you unload the ships...

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42rle 59 points ago +60 / -1

Trucks and truckers are there, what is not there are the chassis. This is what they put the containers on. It seems thT when a trucker pulls a Connex away with a chassis, they are not removing it and instead KEEPING the chassis. Truckers that show up at the port without. Chassis are turned away because the port does not have one for them to pull.

It’s all manufactured. Plenty of trucks, plenty of workers, plenty of goods they are just hiding it out at storage locations, just like they did with lumber

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Dunkin4COVAIDS 29 points ago +29 / -0

Unless there's a massive amount of theft going on (it certainly happens), those chassis typically belong to the trucking companies. There ought to be more than enough for shipping and dock work. If there's a shortage on chassis, something else is going on.

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42rle 14 points ago +18 / -4

did you watch stew peters yesterday? guy from LA port is saying this is whats happening. Highly suggest you seek it out

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2021/10/11/stew-peters-interviews-la-port-worker-to-get-ground-report-on-cargo-ship-backlog/

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Dunkin4COVAIDS 57 points ago +58 / -1

Just watched up through the whistleblower (about the first 7-8 minutes).

I happen to be a logistics manager and work in maritime logistics, and have years working in fleet management, last-mile, and LTL logistics. Our operations are north of LA, but we purchase A LOT of containers from the port down there. There is no doubt something is going on, but I'm not buying what Stew Peters is reporting. The big red flag is his claim that "containers used to cost $2,500 but now cost $25,000". That is just blatant bullshit and false. The price has gone up on containers, but by around 50%, not anywhere close to the 1000% he's falsely claiming. I used to buy 20' enclosed containers for anywhere between $1,500-$3,000. Now I'm paying $2,000-$4,000. So far, we have not seen any shortages of containers. Flat racks, which are less common in the US, are in shortage of supply. But that's less surprising, because they're basically always in short supply. The prices on those have gone up the most, but still not seeing prices north of $8,000 per 20' flat rack.

The other reason I'm not buying the chassis shortage is because unlike a reefer trailer or box trailer (box permanently attached to the chassis), the chassis trailers he's referring to are designed for quick and easy container removal. The claim that all these chassis are just sitting waiting for the goods inside the containers to be unloaded is more bullshit. That's simply not how it works. The driver pulls into the loading yard with an empty chassis trailer, they load a container, he drives away and delivers the container (pulled off the chassis) and leaves to return back to the port for another load.

Furthermore, no one who owns that equipment is going to let it just sit indefinitely without compensation. There are usually contracts setup between trucking companies and end customers, or the shipper to compensate them for standby time/detention time which could start accruing after as little as 1 hour of being detained and runs anywhere from ~$50 to over $100 per hour. No one wants to pay that, so chassis would be unloaded expediently to avoid massive detention costs.

14
AlohaSnackbar 14 points ago +14 / -0

We need to get your ass down there with good reporters to ask the real questions and have real followups.

The problem right now is that even those "investigating" don't speak the right language, so when someone feeds them a line of bullshit, they buy it.

7
Dunkin4COVAIDS 7 points ago +7 / -0

That's not a bad idea really! I need to spend some time looking over the data also. There are plenty of resources out there that track shipping lane volume and whatnot. I just don't follow it much these days because of the uniqueness of my current role and project I'm working on; while I do utilize commercial shipping, the vast majority of my shipping is done by private charter.

5
BewareOfThePug 5 points ago +5 / -0

Use your username :)

"Tonight, we have Dunkin4COVAIDS, on Fox"

3
Monz 3 points ago +3 / -0

Remind us in a couple of days?

1
hey_spike 1 point ago +1 / -0

Do we want this problem solved yet? Most of the stuff coming from China is not essential. We have food, water, shelter, and clothing already.

1
AlohaSnackbar 1 point ago +1 / -0

I'd personally rather not have to shoot my neighbor in the face for the last rolls of toilet paper. So yeah, I want these problems solved.

Don't get me wrong, I ALSO want manufacturing brought back, and tariffs up the ass for various countries, but for right now, I'd kinda like fix this shit.

5
deleted 5 points ago +5 / -0
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Dunkin4COVAIDS 7 points ago +7 / -0

I got that vibe too. But I've also been in the industry long enough to know better than to ask truck drivers and dock workers what their take is on systemic issues. Their field of view, so to speak, is so narrow, they haven't a clue what's going on beyond their truck or the dock. They're more likely to spread rumors they heard at the local truck stop or bar, than to give you anything resembling a coherent analysis of the big picture.

2
The_garynator 2 points ago +2 / -0

That sounds more like shipping cost, not actual container cost. I know the owner of a speaker company and he said the cost to ship a container from china went from ~2500 to ~26000 last I heard. He had to raise his prices by like 10% so he wouldn't lose money on the products.

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Dunkin4COVAIDS 5 points ago +5 / -0

I would agree that if he meant shipping cost, that it's possible that it's $25,000 to ship from LA to China. However, it's never cost $2,500 in more than a decade that I've been working in this industry. Most of my commercial shipping is around $14,500 per 20' container (40' container is close to around $18,000) from LA to NZ (where most of my shipments go). But it's been that price, give or take, for a few years, even since before COVID. So again, there's no 10 fold increase in prices anywhere that I'm seeing, and to claim there is, is either blatantly dishonest or totally naïve.

3
Dum_spiro_spero 3 points ago +3 / -0

Same story here. Construction parts industry story from a CEO I know is quoting around the same increase in cost for containers from China.

2
SnowflakeJuice 2 points ago +2 / -0

That is true, and unless he was selling very small speakers, are very high end ones, he would have had to increase his price by a lot more than 10% to remain profitable

2
texas4ever 2 points ago +2 / -0

Are you talking about buying a new container, or the shipping cost of a container? Because the cost to the East Coast from Asia is approaching 20k. Even from South America it's gone up a lot and is close to 10k. We used to pay a little over 3k from both locations by comparison.

3
Dunkin4COVAIDS 3 points ago +3 / -0

Stew Peters explicitly referenced the cost to purchase a container.

However, you have not paid $3k for shipping from SE China to anywhere in the US for a full, sealed and bonded container in more than a decade, if not in two decades. I've been commercially shipping containers for years and the cost has been far north of that the entire time. Now empty containers? Totally different story, and nowhere close to $20k. I can still get empty containers shipped for under $2,500 from just about anywhere in the world, with the exception of SE Asia; it's always been a bit more expensive coming from rather than to SE Asia.

Yes, we've seen a recent increase due to inflation, and supply and demand, but it's not the 10 fold increase Stew Peters claims. Not even remotely close. The price to ship a container pre COVID from LA to Lyttleton, NZ, as an example, was around $12k for a 20' container and $15k for a 40' container. Now it's roughly $14k and $18k, respectively. Not a massive price increase in the last two years.

2
texas4ever 2 points ago +2 / -0

We've been paying about $3200 for years. I have the receipts. Now it's up to nearly 20k, which is close to a 6 fold increase. It's not 10 fold but 6 fold is accurate. I can only comment on 40' containers sent from Asia & South America to the US East coast.

1
spelunking_librator 1 point ago +1 / -0

what of the chassis are breaking down and no replacement parts are coming in from chyna?

1
Dunkin4COVAIDS 1 point ago +1 / -0

There's always that possibility, but there's really not a lot to breakdown. They're a steel frame, with wheels, and that's about it. No engines, no other moving parts, etc. It's unlikely at best that there would be mass breakdowns of chassis out of nowhere. If they were breaking down, it would be because of tires, axles, wheel bearings, and maybe air brake related issues. But then we'd be seeing that across the entire US in every other type of commercial trailer also, because they use the same components. Most trailers require minimal maintenance to stay on the road.

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Dunkin4COVAIDS 11 points ago +11 / -0

My best educated guess as to why cargo vessels aren't getting unloaded would be more likely due to bottlenecks in the supply chain where the intermediate container yards and warehouses are too full to take any more containers. It's more than likely a downstream issue, rather than trucks just not being able to get loads. I.e. if you keep pushing more in than is moving out, you congest the "pipeline", and eventually no more can go into the "pipeline" until wherever the bottleneck is, is unclogged. I've seen it in rail numerous times. If a rail system gets blocked up for a few days, it can create a shortage for 2-3 weeks.

Another possibility for all the cargo vessels is that economies around the world were basically shut down for months on end last year. A sudden surge in shipping traffic could most definitely cause the congestion we're seeing now.

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SnowflakeJuice 2 points ago +2 / -0

I don't think that is the case. Sure warehouses are full, but a lot of stuff gets pushed out to other warehouses all over the country once it is received.

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Dunkin4COVAIDS 1 point ago +1 / -0

The problem arises when more is coming in than is moving out. This happens all the time with surges in shipping volume. I think what we're seeing is just an above average surge in shipping volume. Read some of my other recent replies for more of an explanation.

1
SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

Freight is always moving. People don't buy product to have it sit in a warehouse.

Even considering the fact people are trying to hold more inventory, that inventory gets distributed to warehouses all over the country.

1
yeldarb1983 1 point ago +1 / -0

Doesn't foreign merch have to sit in customs for a few days as well? Not an expert, just asking.

1
Junionthepipeline 1 point ago +1 / -0

It depends on where you go if it's a company rack or you have to own your own.

4
GeoG85 4 points ago +4 / -0

Remember when they hid the Puerto Rico relief because "Orange Man Bad"?

Then they found it, and the Angry Mob carried a guilotine to the governor's house or whatever? Because fuckin' people DIED at their expense?

Good times.

1
VyseLegendaire 1 point ago +1 / -0

China stopped producing/provding us with sufficient numbers of chassis as well as other maintenance parts for trucks. Drive trains etc.

The parts might well be on the very containers waiting outside of LA.

Also it could be that since truckers are avoiding forced vaxx, that the needed parts just aren't showing in the left-wing port cities. News would never report on it.

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deleted -24 points ago +3 / -27
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Dunkin4COVAIDS 10 points ago +10 / -0

I've been working in trucking and logistics for over a decade. Truckers by and large are not democrats. Blue collar workers in general tend to not be democrats.

8
42rle 8 points ago +8 / -0

yes, i am sure that is indicative of the whole profession. I am certain that all professional OTR operators are cuck faggots just like video game developers......

3
Junionthepipeline 3 points ago +3 / -0

Nowdays it's mostly dumbfuck foriginers and the occasional antisocial white dude.

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
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Dictator_Bob 7 points ago +7 / -0

This man is correct, people. Hear me!

I, too, believe that American Truckers are in favor of tearing down our history, destroying small businesses, burning down our own infrastructure, labelling anyone who disagrees racist, using corporate livelihoods to force medical dictates, and giving hormone blockers to children.

Have you no sense? No sense at all?

Of course our truckers are ALL Riding with Biden. I mean, did you not see the many big rigs that ran convoys for Team Biden during the pandemic? There was at least none of them, zero times.

We all saw.

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TrumpChampBelt 13 points ago +13 / -0

Trucks are having mechanical issues and can't be fixed due to parts shortage.

Manufactured Great Depression 2.0.

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deleted -24 points ago +1 / -25
2
TruthyBrat 2 points ago +2 / -0

There is also the issue that many of the big container ships can't go through the Panama Canal. It's a long way around South America.

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iamherefortheluls 1 point ago +1 / -0

There was a trucker video here filming a port in Califonia - he said truckers are sitting there waiting for work but the port is not unloading anything for some reason.

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Junionthepipeline 1 point ago +1 / -0

No room.

1
Friend_of_John_Galt 1 point ago +1 / -0

If the containers are unloaded, there is at least a chance the people can pick up their shipments themselves.

42
Miami_Man 42 points ago +42 / -0

WE NEED TO BRING MANUFACTURING BACK TO THE UNITED STATES. FUCK GLOBALISM.

28
RandomPanda 28 points ago +29 / -1

Just wait until China shuts down the Panama Canal.

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d_bokk 20 points ago +20 / -0

China doesn't control the Panama Canal, that's why they're trying to build one through communist Nicaragua.

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GabeC1997 12 points ago +12 / -0

...I mean, the more canals the better, but do they not realize that's a little outside their force projection range so we can just snag it after it's done?

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deleted 7 points ago +7 / -0
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RandomPanda 2 points ago +5 / -3

They certainly do. They have a 100 year or so lease on it

6
d_bokk 6 points ago +7 / -1

Not seeing that anywhere, all I can find is China's trying to build a bridge over the canal and attempts at a free trade agreement. Did you make it up?

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RandomPanda 2 points ago +3 / -1

Landbridge Group

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d_bokk 3 points ago +4 / -1

So you made it up? There's a huge difference between the entire Panama Canal and China leasing a port nearby.

0
RandomPanda 0 points ago +3 / -3

It’s not a port nearby. It’s effectively the canal itself.

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d_bokk 2 points ago +2 / -0

Except it isn't.

0
IllKissYourBoobies 0 points ago +1 / -1

Ports are distinct from the canal, itself

The Panamanian Government's Panama Canal Authority oversees its operation and accountability.

1
Pokerking1993 1 point ago +1 / -0

If they had a lease on it they wouldn't have planned on building their own going through Nicaragua.

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Titus45 5 points ago +5 / -0

Many of these ships won't even fit in it. For some the west coast is the only option.

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TAIWANNUMBERONE 21 points ago +24 / -3

It wouldn't matter how open California is. Florida has the largest coastline of any state, period. Making any other state the port capitol is just dumb, weather aside.

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shaven_llama 19 points ago +20 / -1

Alaska has more coastline than the lot of you.

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GabeC1997 18 points ago +18 / -0

True, it'll be great once arctic trade starts picking up.

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henri_derelicte 2 points ago +3 / -1

Alaska could also be a possibility if/when a rail link connecting them with the lower 48 through Canada is built. President Trump greenlit the project, and the Biden regime has yet to pull the plug

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deleted 6 points ago +8 / -2
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shaven_llama 9 points ago +9 / -0

Hey the climate change activists keep saying we’re going to have an ice free arctic… anytime now

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deleted 3 points ago +3 / -0
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deleted 9 points ago +10 / -1
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acasper 7 points ago +8 / -1

Accessible coastline is less important than developed port infrastructure and accessibility for ground transport. Florida isn't bad but the obvious choice is Texas as our primary hub if LA shits the bed mainly because it already is functionally that and there is tons of industry port adjacent.

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Gwoz8881 6 points ago +7 / -1

Florida has the largest coastline of any state

Other than Louisiana, it’s not even close to California or any other state

0
6
Gwoz8881 6 points ago +6 / -0

What? Besides Alaska obviously.

  1. Florida - 8436 miles of coastline

  2. Louisiana - 7721 miles of coastline

  3. Maine - 3478 miles of coastline

  4. California - 3427 miles of coastline

Florida has over twice as much coastline as California. Hell, even the Ozarks has more shoreline than the entire state of California.

3
IsThisPlaceAHoneypot 3 points ago +3 / -0

They'd just have to ship it along the west coastline from Alaska. Between Alaska and the Continental US, there is some very rough Canadian mountainous terrain. Besides, Trudeau would just tax and toll the shit out of the trucking companies.

3
iamherefortheluls 3 points ago +3 / -0

do have points deep enough for these huge ships though. Not a matter of shoreline.

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GabeC1997 12 points ago +14 / -2

...who the fuck thought California could supply the east coast efficiently? Oh, wait, inefficiencies open up room for further corruption and embezzlement.

1
JollyPop 1 point ago +1 / -0

👆👆👆👆👆

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wiseracer 10 points ago +10 / -0

That's a long way from China & India though.

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KeeptheChief 3 points ago +3 / -0

India to California is roughly 8,200 miles, India to Florida is about 8,800. Not a huge difference.

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wiseracer 6 points ago +6 / -0

yeah it's a little more of a hostile trip though.

Edit: Also that's as a plane flies - I was playing around mapping the journey and it's way longer. From China (Hong Kong) to Florida was about 12K any way you travel.

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SnowflakeJuice 2 points ago +2 / -0

Ships don't fly though. So it's either via the Pacific through the Panama Canal or via the Mediterranean/Suez/ Atlantic. Either way it adds a lot of time and expense

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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Not_The_FBI 10 points ago +10 / -0

Same with South Carolina. Our port in Charleston has been pretty busy, more so than normal, for a couple months now, and we can handle it. I keep seeing pictures of empty shelves and shortages of all sorts of things.... I'll see holes on shelves, and Gatorade has been in short supply (I blame that on people panic buying) but other than that, everything has been pretty normal.

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Lol_Garrus 5 points ago +5 / -0

As an SC pede, SC is open for shipping business.

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Not_The_FBI 7 points ago +7 / -0

My work is right on the Charleston Peninsula and the view from atop my building, I can see the entire harbor, all 3 harbor docks, and quite a ways out to sea... we have no back log of ships whatsoever.

1
nerrinc 1 point ago +1 / -0

Charleston pede here as well, they've been dredging hard lately too to accept larger and larger ships. I thought I saw something that they just opened or expanded a new port with a new interstate exit off 526 too.

3
Dum_spiro_spero 3 points ago +3 / -0

Geez, us SC pedes should form a group or something 😁

1
Not_The_FBI 1 point ago +1 / -0

OHH! EMM! GEE!! SC Pedes should form a group! :)

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Not_The_FBI 2 points ago +2 / -0

I think you're right about 526 (only lived here for two years coming Tuesday the 19th) but I do know that the company dredging the harbor recently secured a 15 year contract for it. And early next year we will become the deepest port on the eastern seaboard.

1
texas4ever 1 point ago +1 / -0

We ship a lot through Wilmington NC and some through Charleston, we rarely get delays.

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SnowflakeJuice 2 points ago +2 / -0

The problem is it needs to go through the Panam Canal to get there. Adds a lot of time and expense to the trip

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PewPew_ThaDuK 7 points ago +8 / -1

Fucking DeBoss strikes again. Now Florida will have the greatest shipping ports in the US

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deleted -8 points ago +2 / -10
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blackswans 6 points ago +6 / -0

I have a few friends that are high muckety mucks in the logistics world. They have been saying for some time, or at least since the Panama Canal was widened, that the inland ports are the most efficient. In particular they point to places like Memphis and St Louis with their significant highway and rail options. I saw some plans for a new riverboat / barge that was specifically designed for cargo containers.

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SilverStarv5 4 points ago +4 / -0

That sounds pretty good. If they had that ready right now I think they’d be doing great. Of course rail rates went up too, but if capacity is needed more than speed for your product have at it.

1
henri_derelicte 1 point ago +2 / -1

The one logistical hurdle with an inland port like Memphis or St Louis is that you’d probably need to move the cargo from a bigger boat to a smaller boat somewhere along the line. Panamax ships can only go so far up the Mississippi

1
SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well, they were wrong. Even with the clusterfuck in the CA ports, it's still cheaper to ship there than to the East Coast

1
blackswans 1 point ago +1 / -0

Although this article is four years old, it appears that they may be correct. It "may" be cheaper now,, and that's with the inland infrastructure for intermodal transportation of containers not yet at its full potential. https://www.maritime-executive.com/editorials/comparing-maritime-versus-railway-transportation-costs

1
SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

I ship stuff all the time. and still do, it is not cheaper. I don't know what was going on 4 years ago, I know what is going on 2 years ago, and what is going on now, skimmed through the article and frankly, they don't seem to know what the hell they are talking about either

5
Mamapedia 5 points ago +5 / -0

Wait, we even get our toilet paper from China? Watch yo ass - who knows what it is impregnated with!

4
slimcoat 4 points ago +4 / -0

The coronavirus pandemic has triggered a global supply chain problem.

No it hasn't, poor management and idiotic leadership has. I get so tired of these people blaming everything on the flu.

4
Siteless_Vagrant 4 points ago +4 / -0

Begging your fucking pardon Florida, but you gotta sail past New Orleans AND THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER to get to Florida.

4
RocksCanOnlyWait 4 points ago +4 / -0

The biggest issue for Gulf and East Coast ports is the Panama Canal / going around South America. The largest container ships don't fit through the canal, and going around takes a very long time.

1
SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

It also takes a lot of time and is expensive. Panama must be making a shitton of money.

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dldeuce 3 points ago +3 / -0

Maybe Abbott in Texas should bring Galveston back into the seaport business.

3
Women4Trump2020 3 points ago +3 / -0

I suspect that’s essentially what is driving a significant portion of this backlog of cargo container ships that are not in a hurry to offload. Keep in mind, with Joe Biden inflation going bananas, that durable good inventory is going up in value even as it sits there idle. So unlike times when purchasing agents desperately need to turn the merchandise to get their profit, an increasing static inventory valuation simply becomes another reason for a multinational to be okay with any port delay. If my suspicions are correct, that also means the U.S. economy is in much worse shape than financial media are reporting… another reason for the media to avoid telling the story of cargo vessels and instead deflect the story to imaginary COVID-19 supply chain disruptions. So there’s that.

From article posted in these comments: https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2021/10/11/stew-peters-interviews-la-port-worker-to-get-ground-report-on-cargo-ship-backlog/

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SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

With all due respect that article is asinine. No purchasing manager that wants to keep their job is intentionally delaying inventory. Hell, they get blamed for it even when it's not their fault.

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michaelsuede 2 points ago +2 / -0

Most of the container ships off the coast are too big for the panama canal. They would have to sail all the way around Cape Horn. Massive expense. Not even sure if it is logistically possible to fuel those tankers for such a trip. They require massive port berths and fuel supplies to do that, which are specific to Long Beach. This is what it currently looks like off the coast of CA now. https://rumble.com/vnk85s-ships-backed-up-off-california-coast-10-9-21.html

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Rommsey 2 points ago +2 / -0

Make it so!
PS. I LOVE PANAMA CITY BEACH 😍💖

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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Wintergreen 2 points ago +2 / -0

Can Floridian ports handle the capacity of Very Large Container Ships though? It's infrastructure that needs to be in place. Docks, cranes, warehouses, roads, rail, etc.

1
Not_The_FBI 1 point ago +1 / -0

I read an article earlier tonight about Charleston, South Carolina's new port terminal that they just opened up in April of 2021, first port terminal to be opened in the U.S. since 2009!!! Really!?

1
KnightTemplar 1 point ago +1 / -0

Texas needs to build more ports too

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TruuthSeeker 1 point ago +1 / -0

It never was. Just cheaper for the container companies

1
Swflpede 1 point ago +1 / -0

Isn't the main issue that nearly all US ports are foreign-run?

1
SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

Union Run, even worse

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bwjenkins1 1 point ago +1 / -0

Florida and the port of Houston

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dorsalmorsel 1 point ago +1 / -0

We Trumpsters just need one little outlet to the sea on the West Coast. Our "Danzig Corridor." San Diego would work best methinks.

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daisytrench 1 point ago +1 / -0

I’m pretty sure that the massive cargo ships from China can’t fit through the Panama Canal tho

1
JollyPop 1 point ago +1 / -0

YES ❤️ FUCK CALIFORNIA 💯 I'm in CA btw!!! I read the bullshit excuse from the LA/LongBeach Longshoreman Union boss yesterday. FUCK CALIFORNIA - This is a great opportunity for Texas or Florida DO IT 💪💪💪TAKE IT

1
Argent 1 point ago +1 / -0

Fun fact , six of our top ten ports are either in TX or LA. We don’t need CA.

https://www.bts.gov/content/tonnage-top-50-us-water-ports-ranked-total-tons

1
NoSoMo_ThanU 1 point ago +1 / -0

Companies are already diverting their ships to the east coast. The #1 port in the east is SAV which is getting even larger. Lots of open ports on east coast to use -- just takes longer to transit the PC.

1
SALTYBALLS 1 point ago +1 / -0

Does anyone ever think about how America's borders are changing? There is a reality that our territory will soon look different on a globe.

1
CommieCrats 1 point ago +1 / -0

But china and pelosi and mitch have a deal!

1
Pokerking1993 1 point ago +1 / -0

I feel Texas would be a better, more centrally located location to distribute. But either way, California is holding the US hostage with their mostly closed ports.

1
NonyaDB 1 point ago +1 / -0

Not sure how many of those container ships can actually fit through the Panama Canal (Panamax/New-Panamax sizes can but Super-Panamax/Post-Panamax cannot) and it's too late in the year to go around South America (too cold, storms, ice, etc.) but I admire Florida taking advantage of California's sheer ineptitude.
Due to the massive amount of shipping coming out of Asia and going straight to California in the past few decades, a lot of shipping companies invested in newer, larger ships that cannot fit through the Panama Canal thus pretty much making them completely fucked for any U.S. ports that aren't located on the west coast.
It's why Walmart and other big box places are desperately trying to charter their own boats in Panamax/New-Panamax sizes so they can avoid the west coast backlog by having them go through the Panama Canal and unload in Gulf ports instead.
The Mississippi Delta is also probably going to get a lot more crowded as well.

1
SnowflakeJuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

Panama Canal is slow, that is the biggest issue

1
Greenhills 1 point ago +1 / -0

Watch the water?

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NazisWereSocialist 1 point ago +1 / -0

Which requires you to go through the CCP controlled Panama Canal….

1
ConstutionalCarry 1 point ago +1 / -0

I'd much rather have a dirty bomb go off in a california harbor than a Florida one.