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Comments (150)
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108
polJosephWatson 108 points ago +108 / -0

Climate change is fake and gay.

17
SteveBannonsNckbeard 17 points ago +18 / -1

Beat me to it

8
Erock_The_Red 8 points ago +8 / -0

fpbp

7
saltyviewer123 7 points ago +7 / -0

Yes and No. The climate that is changing is the

Political Climate

and it seems they are fixing to sacrifice anyone for their great reset.

7
Long_time_lurker 7 points ago +7 / -0

Climate change is fake and gay.

Wait, so it's trans?

1
Novus 1 point ago +1 / -0

There are lots of people fake without being trans (as far as we know).

1
Long_time_lurker 1 point ago +1 / -0

Sure, but trans means "fake and gay." Like if you take "transman" with "fake and gay man" you realize that it's a lesbian who thinks they're a man.

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

Mother Earth is a sexless birthing person.

3
deleted 3 points ago +3 / -0
34
NoFats 34 points ago +34 / -0

A car battery is about 70kwh. In the summer time your home probably uses somewhere around 24kwh per day. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see what's going to happen when more and more people make the grid their gas station.

27
IncredibleMrE1 27 points ago +27 / -0

No, but it does take an electrical engineer. Checkmate, bigot!

9
DefenderDad 9 points ago +9 / -0

I want nuclear power station in my backyard.

11
PeterO 11 points ago +11 / -0

YIMBY

Yes In My Back Yard!

1
DefenderDad 1 point ago +1 / -0

Whats even crazier is the by product of a nuclear power plant is: hot water.

The waste from a plant takes decades until it needs to be stored somewhere secure.

2
King5150 2 points ago +2 / -0

radioactive water....lets build a microbrewery and make specialty beers for hipsters.

0
80960KA 0 points ago +1 / -1

If I could lease part of my lot to host one of those 4th gen micro reactors I totally would.

4
Electricutie 4 points ago +4 / -0

But you can't define what an electrical engineer is because you're not a dictionary. Double checkmate, biggerot! Now king me.

10
roadrunner0 10 points ago +10 / -0

It is simple math that these eco-tards can't grasp.. If 10% of the vehicles on US highways were EV instead of gas and each drove 20 miles per day for a month they would consume 1/4 of the power generated in the USA for that month.. So when do the rolling blackouts for homes and businesses begin??

1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 1 point ago +2 / -1

28 million vehicles × 20 miles x 30 days × .26 per kWh = 4.4 billion kWh.

Monthly electric production in the US is 350 billion kWh.

Under 2%, not 25%. Running an electric car for 20 miles is less than running an electric stove and dryer for 4 hours each a day

The USA consumes 1200% as much power as when I was born, when did the rolling blackouts start?

1
80960KA 1 point ago +2 / -1

when did the rolling blackouts start?

In California, in the 2010s. They get worse every year too.

5
Smcnelly 5 points ago +5 / -0

Mine uses 70KWH and summer is not even here yet.

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well and what about this. If it's 100F and dark then I guess I go turn on my car and sit in there for a few hours idling.... It will be expensive but at least I'll have power.

-1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 -1 points ago +1 / -2

Use the batteries to stabilize the grid in exchange for discounted electric costs

26
IncredibleMrE1 26 points ago +26 / -0

As part of the rapidly spreading push for more green energy and the desire of environmentalists to “keep it in the ground” when it comes to coal, oil, and gas, large swaths of electrical production are going away. There are 80 coal-fired plants in 14 states currently scheduled to be closed in just the next six years. Many regions are turning their backs on the construction of new nuclear power plants because of outdated “China Syndrome panic.”

What these activists apparently fail to realize is that coal and nuclear still supply more than 40% of the nation’s electricity. Much of the rest is produced using natural gas.

Holy fuck this is such bullshit. The enviro-nazis know EXACTLY what they are doing, and I am sick and tired of our side giving them a pass.

17
LadyOfLorien 17 points ago +17 / -0

Even if they are legitimately that stupid, they should still hang. A man who causes fatal blackouts because he's too stupid and egotistical to consider the consequences of utopianism is still morally culpable.

5
IncredibleMrE1 5 points ago +5 / -0

Absolutely. I'm just frustrated because yes, there's stupidity involved, but our side just goes with that instead of acknowledging the malice.

2
stratocaster_patriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

That's right. The left have actual blood on their hands directly as a result of their fantasies and resultant actions.

9
IamDevo 9 points ago +9 / -0

Let's let in millions of illegals to put even more strain on the infrastructure! Yay!

2
stratocaster_patriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

And more strain on welfare because there are no available unskilled jobs for them. I think the whole idea here is frankly so the vote mules will have more millions of Hispanics to exploit. Illegals will be voting. Consequently they will also be an ethnic majority in 10 years. Wonder who's border they will cross then.

1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 1 point ago +1 / -0

There is a shortage of construction workers and we are starting the hot season for that

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yeah but just look at the math: 170k a day. Let's assume you need 20 to build a house (I have no idea). 170000/20= 8,500 houses with just one days worth of illegals. I know the math doesn't quite work like that but adding 1% to our population yearly - construction will never keep up with that.

1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 1 point ago +1 / -0

It is about 1000 hours of labor they can do to build a house. Average 8 hours, 125 man/days a house.

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

So let's say 2 houses per man which is 3400 houses a year. Then multiple that every day the next wave of people comes in. And that's if everyone currently in the industry quits.

But here is the real thing, those Mexicans coming in don't know how to build houses either. They don't know to ANYTHING.

2
Geralt_of_Rivia1 2 points ago +2 / -0

I said 1000 hours and not the 2000 hours of labor in building a normal house for a reason - I know what those illegals are good for and what you tell them to get the fuck away from. They are mostly incompetent, don't do really hard labor, don't work truly long hours...

Only good Mexicans I had was a super white Mormon and an old ranch hand

The USA is building more than 2000 houses a day right now, and that excludes other types of work such as landscaping on flippers

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
2
roadrunner0 2 points ago +2 / -0

Heading down the highway to being a third world country in the express lane we are.. Lets hope that this challenge creates a breakthrough in technology before it is to late..

3
Liberty49220 3 points ago +3 / -0

Yeah - the breakthrough was called fracking. So much clean natural gas.

0
roadrunner0 0 points ago +1 / -1

No that is still a fossil fuel consumable.. What I am talking about is cold fusion hydrogen, zero point energy, geothermal etc..

11
M8kMdlErthGr8Again 11 points ago +11 / -0

Pure mismanagement, whether stupid, or on purpose.

Whether there is a crisis, or not, that's what this is.

If they are going to go this route, then you keep all your current infrastructure running, until you can replace it with equivalent or hopefully better options.

It's like, hey, I've got this leaky plug in my boat, but I've got this shiny new better model coming soon. Then you decide to pull the old leaky plug before the new one is even finished. You know what happens next.

6
BillGateCanSuckIt 6 points ago +6 / -0

They are creating energy and food and water shortages on purpose. You are correct, when updating a critical infrastructure system you run the new and old in parallel then slowly phase out the old.

I've read that Israel is so successful using desalination plants they are starting to fill up the black sea. California could solve their water issues using the same technology. This would require extra energy via nuclear to run the desalination plants, but then California grid would also benefit.

Silly truck emissions and vaccine requirements is also throttling shipping. Union Pacific (blackrock owned) is throttling fertilizer and fuel.

All our issues are fucking done on purpose to create shortages. And what the fuck is Buttigig doing?

4
powershellder 4 points ago +4 / -0

California had full reservoirs that would have provided five years of use.

They dumped it into the ocean.

4
TrannyClausSliceDice 4 points ago +4 / -0

Ahem.

It’s ButtGag. That is his name.

1
Cthaat 1 point ago +1 / -0

Reducing the population, as per his orders.

1
CrispyQuesoSalami 1 point ago +1 / -0

Its thr Afghanistan Withdrawal method.

You pull the troops out FIRST, then you evacuate everyone else from a position of weakness and negative leverage!

11
leakmouth 11 points ago +11 / -0

Texan here. Just fucking secede already

5
ZyramRo 5 points ago +5 / -0

We won't, our primary races were rigged or people are too dumb to look local, school boards in DFW aside. I am all for it, and I think multiple states need to secede not just us, but I don't think it's politically possible right now with the people we have in office at state level, the majority are NOT supporters of secession they're party hacks. We had 3 good options to replace abbot and we couldn't, makes me sad.

4
Cyer6 4 points ago +4 / -0

I keep hearing about the DFW school board success but I have no idea how the rest of the state went. There is another election coming the week of May 24th and that will include the runoffs for the AG. Must get Paxton back in there!

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

I'm not arguing with you but could someone please explain the strategy to me of running away versus saying, 'nope this is all our shit and we're keeping every inch!". I don't see how succession solves anything. Why were we ever One Nation if it was just until things got tough and then we break apart and then "screw you guys I got mine tough shit better luck next time." I don't see how this is much different than the left wanting us gone if we don't "get with the program".

Granted, I may be missing something which is why I asked an honest question but I tell you this, you guys succeed and you will regret it when we take back the embattled areas. We will make sure you guys have no trade with us and we will say we never knew you. Do what you like to them. Better start creating all those new industries right now and start building a bran new military from the ground up.

4
_Sully_ 4 points ago +4 / -0

One of the goals of the power outages last winter was to force the conversation about the Texas grid being independent. They want to force it into a national grid. The power outages were absolutely intentional. They purposely removed the safe guards and intentionally short squeezed the energy market. What’s funny is it destroyed the alternative energy industry. It could be a combination of environmental expediency and sickening greed.

1
Rosarian 1 point ago +1 / -0

If things keep getting worse, maybe Texit can happen. I think other states in flyover country would join us.

9
Spawnlingman 9 points ago +9 / -0

I want to hear more 1st hand stories of shortages. I'm about 45 minutes outside of Baltimore and our grocery stores haven't seen any shortages, no empty shelves, our Target\Walmart have formula. (we don't have a need for it but I looked and it's there). The only thing I see actually happening that I can personally witness to is that gas is $4.39 here.

6
stratocaster_patriot 6 points ago +6 / -0

Seattle, I don't see it either. This will sound strange maybe buy I did start assuming this was coming last winter. Not because of the shelves but I went to the grocery store one day and had this odd surreal feeling come over me. I was imagining all these people in the store bundled up wandering around the Christmas decorations scrounging dregs from empty shelves and realizing that it was a first in everyone's life. Right then and there I started stocking up.

The only thing I really witness is red meat at $20/lb, expensive produce which has been almost complete garbage for over a year. March and April came and went and I still paid $5/lb for asparagus in season. WA state and the cheapest apples have been $3/lb for over a year and they quickly brown in the center the minute you cut them so probably frozen for 2 years. I'm guessing China gets the good stuff. Even the onions and garlic looks like total shit.

3
TrappedRed_in_blue 3 points ago +3 / -0

I'm in Portland suburbs and it has been a mixed bag. Some stores are fully stocked one week and the next no meat and crap produce. Last year I switched to buying my produce from a CSA and while the prices are a little more than the grocery store, the grocery store is catching up to the CSA prices.

Bonus is that for now the prices for meat and veggies will hold stable for the CSA this year, so upfront it was a bit hard but we're eating better. May be worth it to check one out in your area. Mine is through my homeschool group so I get to support all conservatives too!

4
TrannyClausSliceDice 4 points ago +4 / -0

Yeah…I’m with you.

Don’t get me wrong. I can definitely see shit going bad (it is bad now with pure degeneracy running afoul… democrats in charge etc)

But I keep on seeing; especially on here, that average Americans will experience severe food shortages, starvation, no food on shelves, food riots etc but i haven’t seen anything of the sort.

I have seen a relatively dramatic increase in grocery bills tho. And obviously gas is fucking expensive. I’ve seen an increase in my utility bills. All of which is awful and strictly due to democrats but all the “scary” doom and gloom i have not seen?

My local groceries, gas stations etc are full to the brim with food. As well as baby formula etc.

But sometimes when reading this site it is insinuated that we will be borderline chaos within a year with severe blackouts, food riots, starvation etc ?

3
Spawnlingman 3 points ago +3 / -0

Yeah I mean I have been stocking up on food that lasts 2-3 years. I've been actively preparing as much as I feel I need to, and connecting with locals here. I just ask my question because I do live in a blue state. I'm an hour from DC, and 45 from Baltimore. I just haven't seen a glimpse of shortages yet - price increases yes. Guess we will see and can only be prepared.

3
roadrunner0 3 points ago +3 / -0

It is mainly in the Leftist cesspool cities where theft has been so high the stores are just not stocking the shelves anymore..

7
GenericInsult 7 points ago +7 / -0

The Left: "sEe! wE NeEd mOrE eNeRgY LiKe sOlAr!"

(All while deliberately crippling the fossil fuel industry)

2
TheWiseBuffalo 2 points ago +2 / -0

I don't get it. they keep screaming this, yet they never put it into action to prove it. Seriously if it's so great then I expect every house and building in California to have solar panels but nope.

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

Rooftop solar is fucking retarded. I weigh more than the weight limit for asphalt shingle roofs, let alone me carrying a solar panel. That weight limit is 185lbs.

Do it on the ground on screw piers

5
CMDRConanAAnderson 5 points ago +5 / -0

Round these parts they're already pulling one out of the communist handbook: when power outages happen they blame the people for using too much power. Likely half the people here don't even know big cities across the US are inching closer to mandating so called "flex" power schedules where you can be punished with higher rates either depending on whether you use too much monthly power or even if you too much at the "wrong" hours. It's gotten to the point where people will blame each other for using their AC on a hot day instead blaming the fucking idiots in charge of delivering power to the city. Won't be long now before we start ratting each other out for using the washing machine during a hot day.

5
BringTheCat789 5 points ago +5 / -0

The concept of a "flex" power schedule is great. Electricity is a scarce resource that cannot be stored easily in quantities that matter in this context and its demand fluctuates. It's basic economics for electricity to be more expensive during periods of high demand where supply cannot keep up. The best way to manage scarce resources is free market pricing.

With that said, the issue is with the weaponization of the "flex" power schedule. Instead of basing it off of supply and demand, for example, randomly upping the price as a way to prevent people from using the electricity to "help the climate." And artificially reducing the supply by forcing power plants to shut down, which drives the price up on these plans.

3
CMDRConanAAnderson 3 points ago +3 / -0

It's already gone from a good idea to mandatory in the span of about 6 years. Residents in certain states have been getting letters from the power companies stating that they can save by switching to to flex schedules where fixed rates are based on power consumption by hour slots of the day. At first this was optional and a good idea but just in the past year it became mandatory. Now if you run a businesses that requires higher power consumption for a noon rush you're punished with rates as high as 2x what you paid in the past. There are a few holdouts like myself, but we're already being given letters suggesting that if we don't swap, our non-flex power plan will be raising rates. This is on top of the power rate hikes that continue nearly every year. They're already justifying even more rate hikes on basis that they're in need of more power plants.

1
BringTheCat789 1 point ago +1 / -0

If it is the power company that's making it mandatory, then that is fine. But the minute the government steps in an starts artificially raising rates at some odd hours of the day, then it's not fine.

Also, another way this isn't "fine" is as a symptom. If this is being done just because it's a better business model, then fine. But if it's being done as a result of not having enough power as a result of government regulations artificially stopping production then that is not fine.

1
CMDRConanAAnderson 1 point ago +1 / -0

Radical idea here, but how about an energy company produces enough power to supply the state, especially during a heatwave or emergency? There is no justification for these measures, unless they already have the power on tap to supply everyone. If they had energy threshold to supply the city I agree that would be fine. Clearly however, this is a work around for not having enough power to supply the tax payers who fund their projects and pay them for services.

1
BringTheCat789 1 point ago +1 / -0

Produces enough power to supply the state, especially during a heatwave or emergency

This is easier said than done. While, of course, I agree with you if the reason this is being done is a "green" initiative forced by the government, a lot of times it's just logistical.

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

I've always taken long hot showers even though I know how wasteful and selfish that is. It's a guilty pleasure in a life where I don't do much for pleasure. Why? Because it's one of the things that have always represented something wonderful technologically we have done for ourselves and represented, to me, a height of accomplishment of sorts (like a flush toilet). That and I knew damned well that at some point in my life it was going to go away and only be a fond memory. I just hadn't expected it to come from my lefty friends becoming insane and regulating me out of it. I guess I had always just been expecting and "end time".

2
CMDRConanAAnderson 2 points ago +2 / -0

That the time has arrived is no surprise to anyone. The only real mystery is whether we can overcome this debacle. It can be delayed, stalled, halted for a moment, but can this evil be repelled and destroyed? Not if we continually employ peaceful resistance against insurgents who have and are willing to commit violence against us.

3
NADSAQ 3 points ago +3 / -0

I have a great idea: Let’s add 100 million electric cars to this.

1
roadrunner0 1 point ago +1 / -0

It takes on average 7kwh of electric to drive 20 miles in an EV so you might have an EV in the drive with that many but you have hell trying to charge it..

0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

7kWh is the same as two loads of laundry. That is 84 cents of power now

2
roadrunner0 2 points ago +2 / -0

Not here, we pay 5.25 cents per KWH and 18.5 cents per kwh for transportation so 23.75 x 7 = $1.66.. My solar makes 7kwh in about 1.25 hours on a sunny day which charges my 425adc battery bank back to full.. After that we use another 10kwh throughout the day in our home.. Our lowest power bill last summer was $23 and I figure we save about $550 a year off the bill.. Power company got so up tight about it they put in a smart spy meter.. The system I have is so smart it never back feeds to the grid because around here to setup a bidirectional account is pretty much impossible.. If I could afford another $10k investment I would consider disconnecting completely from the overpriced grid..

3
MythArcana 3 points ago +3 / -0

Lots of blackouts in the Biden admin, if ya' know what I mean.

3
CnnWillBlackmailYou 3 points ago +3 / -0

They pull that shit on me and I'll sue them for the $3000 worth of food in my freezers. I mean, I have a backup generator, but they don't know that.

0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

Sure thing, but it is 40k out of your pocket to deal with that lawsuit

2
CnnWillBlackmailYou 2 points ago +2 / -0

They fuck ya at the drive thru.

3
MickHigan2 3 points ago +4 / -1

How about... and I know this may sound radical... but fuck them and keep them up ourselves? Perhaps saying "fuck you" and not listening nor abiding by anything they want to do?

2
BringTheCat789 2 points ago +2 / -0

How do you propose I start a coal power plant?

0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

How about go off grid with solar?

2
WindyCityBluez 2 points ago +2 / -0

Their only goal is to destroy the middle class. They think we have too much money.

2
CrispyQuesoSalami 2 points ago +2 / -0

And that dastardly Vladimir Putin!

And also because of racism.

Oh oh, and also COVID!

And muH body Muh Choice as well!

And....and....we'll find some other reasons soon enough!

2
ExileOnRedditStreet 2 points ago +2 / -0

No. Because racism.

2
deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
2
Plutocratkiller 2 points ago +2 / -0

The climate has always changed

1
Paul_Revere 1 point ago +1 / -0

I had the runs this morning. I blame it on Climate Change and Systemic Racism.

1
_Sully_ 1 point ago +1 / -0

Environmentalists are misanthropes. They look down their nose at you as if you were a heretic ripe for for the stake. They want to force behavior and a sea change but they don’t care if their plan is full of insurmountable obstacles. You will suffer and they will rejoice.

1
stratocaster_patriot 1 point ago +1 / -0

Hey Nancy I have an idea. How about we have 8 different times zones west to east in CA so everybody wakes up at different times and uses power at different times. Heck Nancy it's in the Bible that you study so often. Acts 17:26.

1
dagoat4l 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well the 80 billion dead folks voted for all this.

1
cook_does 1 point ago +1 / -0

The political climate is the only thing changing. Make guillotiens great again

1
BarnStorm 1 point ago +1 / -0

manmade energy crisis

1
Goldlight 1 point ago +1 / -0

shithole states are shitholes

1
Alpha_Lemming 1 point ago +1 / -0

The coal restrictions affect non-shithole states, too.

1
mikethemarine 1 point ago +1 / -0

I said this before and will say it again, if we as humans are causing this, shut down EVERYTHING FOR TWO YEARS AND SEE IF IT MAKES AN EFFECT, no farms no gas no electricity, NO NOTHING, survive on your own.

But also note there will be, NO TAXES, NO BILLS TO PAY, AND ANYTHING YOU OWE NOW STAYS STAGNANT, NO MORE INCREASED Debt.

Everything will be bartered for what you need, NO government aid for sure, cause that is exactly what they are doing this for in the first place, TO TAKE OVER EVERY ASPECT OF OUR LIVES.

Don't fall for it

1
VonBustacap 1 point ago +1 / -0

Cool, electric shortages. Let's all start buying EV's to solve the problem! /s

0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

Which is why I have off grid solar

0
80960KA 0 points ago +1 / -1

Just spend piles and piles of your own money (or better yet, borrow it!) to solve a problem artificially created by conmen and greentards, rather than having a reliable electrical grid.

Great idea, grandpa.

1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 1 point ago +1 / -0

It was 120k to get electric to my property, 40k to go off grid solar.

0
80960KA 0 points ago +1 / -1

Good for you. Not viable for many others, or simply something that they'd rather not spend 5 figures on when there's no reason the grid shouldn't be reliable other than greentards and grifters.

0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

You can get a damn good DIY solar setup with grid tie-in + small battery array for ~9k, which is pre tax income and will eliminate your power bill as well as add to the equity in your home

-1
80960KA -1 points ago +1 / -2

Oh gee, you quoted upper four figures because that's so much better. Still a substantial pile of money spent on a basic utility that worked fine for decades until retards started making it "green" or just letting it decay.

"Eliminate your power bill" isn't that attractive when the break-even point is around the same time you need new batteries.

None of this changes that I'm thinking about such a system but it's not because I particularly want such a system. I know power grids work fine, and I know the "climate crisis" is a con used to sell greenshit most people don't want to buy unless forced.

-1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 -1 points ago +1 / -2

"Eliminate your power bill" isn't that attractive when the break-even point is around the same time you need new batteries.

You dont need batteries and the break even point for battery installation is instant due to the additional home equity. And replacement for batteries is ~700 bucks

0
80960KA 0 points ago +1 / -1

You dont need batteries

Then you're not off grid. The whole reason for even entertaining this is the increasing unreliability, agedness, and insufficiency of the grid.

additional home equity.

Only relevant if I intend to borrow against or sell my house. Until that point it's a cost.

replacement for batteries is ~700 bucks

700 bucks won't even get you 2 deep cycle AGM RV batteries what are you smoking

-1
papa_newguineapig -1 points ago +1 / -2

And here I've been arguing with morons on here about solar, and its unbelievable value.

Wife and I bought our system out right two years ago. We've already just about broke even, haven't had an electric bill since, and won't ever have another one. When people are struggling and rationing their electricity to avoid $1000 bills, I'll be leaving all the lights on in the house for you.

But the ROI on solar is shit, and anyone spending their money on it is stupid. Amirite?

0
Geralt_of_Rivia1 0 points ago +1 / -1

A DIY solar setup is one of the best investments you can make ROI wise. 14-30% annual returns.

Paid labor the math gets complicated

But this place gets retarded when you talk about electric cars, solar, or wind

1
papa_newguineapig 1 point ago +2 / -1

It sure does lol. What's funny is they're all dead wrong.

-9
TheMadManDidItAgain -9 points ago +3 / -12
  1. I'm OK with blackouts. I don't need A/C. I don't need to charge a car.
  2. The first thing that will be limited are A/C and charging EVs.
  3. I hate TV. I'd rather sit outside and listen to music and watch the trees grow, or watch my chickens peck.

I say, bring on the power shortage. I can handle myself.

8
OrangeElvis 8 points ago +8 / -0

Power shortages are totally unnecessary and cost money and lives. I am happy for you, but you are not the only person out there.

1
TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

You also must understand that with these blackouts, people are going to realize how important our fossil fuels are. Without actual financial loss, or losses to the people experiencing these blackouts, things are not going to change. People will continue to elect in individuals trying to push for the green deal which will cause more blackouts. It's a sad state of affairs, but until a lot of these people feel the consequences of their actions (who they 'elected' in), things won't change.

1
OrangeElvis 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well I feel pretty strongly the world is about to find that out. Germany and parts of the US are going to have rationing and rolling blackouts during the harshest weather when demand is highest.

2
TheMadManDidItAgain 2 points ago +2 / -0

I agree. It sucks, big time. I feel that, even in our worst state of affairs, we'll still have operating water and operating sewage. I see electricity and gas shortages as an inevitability, which is going to suck in the winter time, for sure. I'm in the north and we get cold winters (not extreme, but single digit and negative sometimes). If we are without heat, I can at least keep my house from being destroyed from freezing pipes, and we can remain, at least above freezing, indefinitely with how I have set up my place.

The good news is, at least, if we have no electricity in the winter, at least our refrigerators won't need it then.....

1
TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

I understand that. But there are a huge amount of people who are prepared. If there is a food shortage, we're ready. If the power grid goes down, we're ready. If water becomes tainted... we're ready. We have light sources. We have protection. We have medicines.

In the end, only the strong, well thought out people who prepared will be left.

Don't get me wrong... I'd rather have prosperity for all. But I have a feeling things are going to continue to get worse before they get better.

1
OrangeElvis 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well, I have backup power generator that can plug into my home breaker box, an extra 30 gallons of fuel + five 20lb propane tanks and about three months worth of rations, but if shit goes dark for longer than that it is going to be armageddon. 6 months of blackout nationwide will kill something like half of the population. nobody wants that. Even three months will make urban areas a living hell.

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censorthisss 4 points ago +4 / -0

They're crippling western society on purpose and you're like hurr durr I'll just go outside and stare at a tree

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TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

I understand what you're saying... sounds like you are somebody who can't afford to miss a couple meals.

There are a huge amount of people who are prepared. If there is a food shortage, we're ready. If the power grid goes down, we're ready. If water becomes tainted... we're ready. We have light sources. We have protection. We have medicines.

In the end, only the strong, well thought out people who prepared will be left.

Don't get me wrong... I'd rather have prosperity for all. But I have a feeling things are going to continue to get worse before they get better.

..... and you're like 'hurr durr I never thought that I would have to have extra food, I've always just bought it off the grocery store shelf..."

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censorthisss 0 points ago +0 / -0

I can be prepared and still be pissed about what they're doing...

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TheMadManDidItAgain 2 points ago +2 / -0

Me too. I'm not saying I'm happy about all this shit. I'm saying I'm prepared... bring it on.

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censorthisss 1 point ago +1 / -0

Fair enough

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TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

You also must understand that with these blackouts, people are going to realize how important our fossil fuels are. Without actual financial loss, or losses to the people experiencing these blackouts, things are not going to change. People will continue to elect in individuals trying to push for the green deal which will cause more blackouts. It's a sad state of affairs, but until a lot of these people feel the consequences of their actions (who they 'elected' in), things won't change.

Are you prepared for that? It's an inevitability. We are only 4 missed meals from mass chaos. And there's only so much one can do. First is family. Next are friends and neighbors. And then you are at the point where all you can do is wait out the storm.

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censorthisss 1 point ago +1 / -0

I guess I just don't have faith that enough people will wake up. This idea that if things get bad enough, people will demand that we return to 1990 America or whatever isn't likely.

1
TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

The vast majority of people are not like these crazy lunatic leftists that dominate the news. Most democrats (who are not leftists) can say "yeah, climate change is really important, we need to solve that issue!" but not feel like it has to be solved all at once where gas shortages and electricity shortages happen. Most feel that we should migrate to 'clean' energy, but also recognize it cannot be all at once... they don't want this. These people will be much more willing to vote for somebody who says "we need more electricity now, we can worry about clean fuel in steps, but we went too fast, we need to back up a bit..."

Personally, I'm semi-ok with 'clean' fuel. I'm 100% ok with fossil fuel. I think CO2 is beneficial for our planet... I think trying to remove CO2 from the environment is an incredibly retarded idea.

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BringTheCat789 2 points ago +2 / -0

charging EVs

They will not limit charging EVs. While they are going to be the single biggest power hog, they will not limit them because that shows too poignantly how stupid EVs are. They want everyone to switch to EVs. They won't limit them because that will prevent that switchover. Maybe after the switchover, they'll limit them when gasoline powered cars are a thing of the past.

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TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

You have a good point here. But it depends on what the word 'limit' means here. There are already limits on how and where people can charge their EVs. There are schedules. Some of these cars are smart enough to only charge during scheduled times, or when the power rate is cheaper.

So, they may not be saying "you cannot charge your EV" as much as there may be slots for when people can charge their EV and if they charge outside those slots, it is done at a premium. I could see some EV charging stations being out of service during peak times. Heck, I could see a software update in these EVs that make it so they can only charge at certain places or in certain times.

I can also see that if you are willing to pay an extra tax, you may be allowed to charge your EV anywhere at anytime.

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BringTheCat789 2 points ago +2 / -0

There are a lot of good ways of handling EV charging. And the free market will handle it.

The problem I have is when the government steps in, or when monopolies play their hand, and force you to do it their way.

One such example would be using EVs as a sort of power storage. One of the main problems with the power grid is that electricity cannot be economically stored at that scale, so production must match demand at any given moment. But with EVs essentially being batteries plugged into the grid to charge, a consumer could be incentivized to keep their EV plugged in while they are not using it and allowing the grid to leech power from it at certain times. It gets charged while there is a surplus of electricity and is utilized when there is a deficit. Obviously, there are downsides to the consumer (decreased battery life, not necessarily being fully charged when you need it, etc.) which is why it would need to be incentivized.

This is a great idea in theory, and would be a great idea if the free market implemented it. But will be horribly dystopian the minute the government decides to force it onto you, or monopolies force it onto you.

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Geralt_of_Rivia1 -1 points ago +1 / -2

EVs use less than dryers and electric stoves.

1
BringTheCat789 1 point ago +1 / -0

This is non-nonsensical.

1)You have to factor it over time, not just the raw amperage. An EV charging all night at 30 amps still uses far more electricity than a dryer running for an hour at 30 amps.

  1. And, going along with that, the amperage you choose affects how fast your battery charges. So an EV can easily draw more current at a given moment than a dryer. So unless the government artificially limits how fast you can charge your EV, the EV will easily draw more than a dryer.

  2. Current EVs charge often at 50 amp. Dryers go on 30 amp circuits. Raw number is even bigger.

  3. The charging current of the EV is much closer to what it will actually continuously draw than the current rating of a dryer.

  4. Electric dryers and stoves won't somehow go away when EVs are mass adopted.

1
Geralt_of_Rivia1 1 point ago +1 / -0

An average electric dryer is 3kWh per load. A tesla is .26kWh per mile and the average american drives 39 miles a day. 3 loads of laundry through your dryer (not counting washer) is equivalent to driving a tesla SUV.

An electric oven also uses 3kWh per hour, and an electric stovetop 2kWh per hour. A tesla is equivalent to 2 hours with an electric stovetop and two hours with an electric oven on.

Electric cars are charged by definition during non-peak hours as there are apps that work with utility companies to utilize floating rate plans to their full efficiency (power plants like producing a consistent amount of power). And when people are willing to drive to the other side of town for cheaper gas, dont tell me they are too lazy to do this. They only need to charge for an hour a day while they have a 16 hour window to do so, which is at night and by definition not peak hours

The charging current of the EV is much closer to what it will actually continuously draw than the current rating of a dryer.

An EV only charges during the time to do one load of laundry, they dont continuously draw power

1
BringTheCat789 1 point ago +1 / -0

The average american drives 39 miles a day. 3 loads of laundry through your dryer (not counting washer) is equivalent to driving a tesla SUV.

No, it'd be the equivalent to driving a Tesla SUV for one average day. Do you think the average family runs 3 loads of laundry every day?

2 hours with an electric stovetop and 2 hours with an electric oven

Do you think the average American family uses an electric stovetop with all the burners on and and an electric oven on high for 2 hours every single day?

Putting aside the fact that most American familes don't exactly "cook" every day and then how rare it is for them to cook a "complicated" enough meal to require both the stovetop and the oven, let alone all the burners.

And for 2 hours each? On high, you'll burn whatever you're cooking if it is on there longer than a couple minutes. The only way that anyone is going to have any burners (let alone all of them) on for 2 hours is if they're slow simmering something on low.

kWh per hour

No comment.

People are willing to drive to the other side of town for cheaper gas

Few people do this. Why? Because it is rarely economical. The only people who do this are very broke and very stupid (can't do the math). In addition to laziness. Most people are willing to drive sometimes slightly out of their way to a different gas station for fuel savings, but never across town.

Don't tell me they are too lazy to do this.

Many aren't. But in a convenience focused society, a significant enough portion are too lazy to bother with this. I know people who won't even go a few hundred yards up the road to get gas for literally 20 cents cheaper.

An EV only charges during the time to do one load of laundry, they don't continuously draw power.

It depends on how empty the battery is. People may only drive on average 39 miles a day, but, in practice, many people will not be plugging in every day. People will likely treat it much more similar to a gas tank, where they only plug in on days they're nearing empty. So the "peak hours" efficiencies are not going to be as nice as you present.

There are many reasons why people will only charge when they have to. The biggest is laziness. But also a (possible) misconception that charging nightly instead of at empty will damage their battery over time. And another is budgetary. Once you have poorer people owning EVs, depending on how their electricity is billed (which may change going forward as we become more electrified), you'll have people who can't afford to charge that night because they don't get paid until next week.

But, above all else, the reality is that these EVs are not replacing electric dryers and electric stoves, which will still be on the grid. They are in addition to them. It doesn't matter if they use more or less electricity, when they're being charged on top of using an electric dryer and stove. And, on top of that, you'll likely see a push for more electrification of dryers and stoves as we move away from propane and natural gas.

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Geralt_of_Rivia1 1 point ago +1 / -0

You are presuming people drive 300 miles a day on average.

Your device does not constantly have power dumped into it while it is plugged in. That would kill electrical devices. Learn anything about electric devices

I used average numbers, not high numbers. Yes, the average family does exactly that, and I didn't use max for either the stove or cooktop, that would be twice as high

And yes, kWh per hour is correct. Kilowatt is matter of flow, kWh is an actual amount of electricity. I don't say 2 gallons per hour (a measurement of flow) for an hour, I say 120 gallons per hour

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BringTheCat789 1 point ago +1 / -0

You are presuming people drive 300 miles a day on average.

No I'm not. But you are presuming people wash 3 loads of laundry a day and use an electric oven for 2 hours and an electric stove for 2 hours a day on average.

I didn't use the max for either the stove or cooktop, that would be twice as high.

Max for the stove and cooktop without tripping a breaker is 7.2 kw. That is the absolute max. Average cooking gets no where close to that, and ranges/ovens are designed to not even be capable of drawing that much current. If you're using your stove and oven for 2 hours a day, you are probably using significantly less than half of that. You will not be using all your burners, and you'll be simmering something on low. And, again, the average American doesn't even cook once a day, let alone a meal that requires both oven and stovetop for two hours each.

And yes, kWh per hour is correct. Kilowatt is matter of flow, kWh is an actual amount of electricity. I don't say 2 gallons per hour (a measurement of flow) for an hour, I say 120 gallons per hour

kWh (kilowatt-hour) per hour would literally just be kilowatts. (kw*h/h = kw). So technically "correct" but it makes you sound like a fool. I assumed it was a simple typo and was just joking, but you doubled down and now you really look dumb. It's as correct as saying mile newtons per hour newton or some bullshit. Technically it's still mph, but it's non-sensical.

Kilowatt is a matter of flow

A kilowatt is a unit of power. Current is a measure of flow. Power is a measure of current and potential. You can have a lot of electrons flowing and have very little power. Likewise, you can have just a few electrons flowing and have a ton of power.

kWh is an actual amount of electricity

A kilowatt-hour is a unit of energy. Energy is power applied over time. It's useful in cases where time is relevant, like charging a battery, or being billed for electricity. It's what fairly compares in a situation where one person utilizes 1kw of power for 1 hour and another person utilizes .1kw of power for 10 hours.

I don't say 2 gallons per hour for an hour

Yes, but yet that's exactly what you said when you said kWh per hour. Gallons per hour for an hour translates to gallon-hours per hour. Ironically, you've proven my point with this perfect example.

And, to further explain how it simplifies, if you have 2 gallons per hour for an hour (2 gallon-hours/hour), you would end up with 2 gallons per 1 hour for 1 hour. (2gal/1hour)*1hour = 2 gallons. Notice how the hours cancel out to leave you with just gallons. Just as kWh/hour cancels out to just be kW.

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TrannyClausSliceDice 0 points ago +1 / -1

This is one of the dumbest fucking comments I’ve see on this forum.

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TheMadManDidItAgain 1 point ago +1 / -0

By "this," you must be referring to your own comment.