9
RStroud 9 points ago +9 / -0

Tossing TNT around on the Minecraft server is acceptable, just drives more people to the admins demanding rules and lockdowns. Shut down the server and people will go ape shit.

The server is more vulnerable to disruption than the game environment. You don't even need a huge bot network to DDOS, digging in the wrong (right?) spot works even better.

The physical layers that connect users to the Minecraft server traverse thousands of miles of territory not controlled or monitored by the server admins. They're all conspicuously marked and well documented so that people don't inadvertently hit them with a backhoe, encroach on easements, or inadvertently fly airplanes into them. It's crazy that a few seconds of vandalism can cause thousands of dollars in damage and weeks of repair work. Minecraft servers could be inaccessible for weeks or months.

Maintaining a modern civilized Minecraft server is hard, and requires tons of effort, policing, coordination, engineering, time, and manpower. Destroying it is fairly trivial, requires little time, minimal training, and a fraction of the manpower.

6
RStroud 6 points ago +6 / -0

It did. Problem was only about half of people ever graduated. Like nearly everything else, this began to change rapidly in the 1970s. Now 90% graduate, though less than 50% are actually on grade level. Watering down the High School diploma to a pulse check made it worthless, but it sure looked good for the administrators. And, it kept the destructive kids off the street, and next to the kids trying to learn.

4
RStroud 4 points ago +4 / -0

You don't have to have crazy covenants. Forbid subdivision and more than one dwelling per lot. Set sensible setbacks and square-foot minimums, based on lot size. Don't have an official HOA, let individuals or groups enforce the rules in small claims court.

Good zoning and public health laws (and enforcement) should already do this in most areas. 30 illegals stacked in like sardines in 1000 square feet is likely an enforcement issue.

Other alternative is to own enough land so that you don't see your neighbors.

2
RStroud 2 points ago +2 / -0

Just saw the video. Guy didn't seem to be in that much distress for a dude that voluntarily locked his neck into industrial machinery controlled by illegal immigrants that would disappear immediately if something went wrong.

1
RStroud 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yeah, that screams entry level "please, I'm begging you, give me my first paying job" cv. Didn't even list an internship, which is basically everything for that career field.

6
RStroud 6 points ago +6 / -0

Anyone that waited this late into the game to get their shot is skeptical of the propaganda on some level. They're casualties, and probably demoralized, no need to put them through a purity spiral.

1
RStroud 1 point ago +1 / -0

Labeling, packaging, and branding matter. They're two legally distinct products. The "literally the same thing" is pilpul to obfuscate that fact.

4
RStroud 4 points ago +4 / -0

Comirnaty isn't authorized for kids (or booster), but the Pfizer EUA is. Kids & booster are the biggest growth market, particularly if we believe the ~75% numbers from the CDC.

If you peel back the "Approved" announcement, it was and still is a big bait-and-switch. Many people believe they received an "Approved" product.

Even if I'm willing to give Pfizer the benefit of the doubt, why act shady if you're not doing shady things? Why have countless media factchecks obfuscate this fact? You shouldn't have to pay such close attention and read so carefully between the lines when other party is acting in good faith and being truthful.

4
RStroud 4 points ago +4 / -0

A distinct place name makes it easier to filter references to such an operation programmatically. Three points of reference, and delete/filter any post related to it.

10
RStroud 10 points ago +10 / -0

My understanding is, although it is technically approved, you can't actually get the approved product because they're not producing any using that labeling (they're supposedly identical besides this).

You'd think "this one is actually approved" would be marketable distinction, with three otherwise indistinguishable products on the market vying for arms to be injected into. And, it would be as simple as a packaging change.

The fact that they could do this, but haven't done this and acting like they have is suspicious. It is bad-faith marketing, at least, to not make it clear that the product being distributed is still only under emergency use authorization.

But they continually act in bad faith, and operate on force rather than transparency and trust.

22
RStroud 22 points ago +22 / -0

Technically not a nut, but a legume. Peanut butter is closer to hummus or refried beans than almond butter.

12
RStroud 12 points ago +12 / -0

Absolutely. We generally don't appreciate his irony because it involves spiritual correction.

I came into this world for judgment so that those who do not see may see, and those who do see may become blind.

John is full of this type of ironic contradiction, where Jesus turns everything on it's head. The various kings of Israel having severe character flaws that all get highlighted in various ways is another example.

3
RStroud 3 points ago +3 / -0

I'd add that current case law has no objective test for race/color, sex, or sexual orientation. They've consistently ruled that genitals, doctors' opinions, and melanin content don't matter. Anyone can be a black female lesbian, like myself. You just have to hold yourself to be one consistently and publicly.

7
RStroud 7 points ago +7 / -0

Gets complicated. Senior discounts, "ladies night", and affirmative action are okay even though they're obviously a form of discrimination. The case law on discrimination is a confusing maze of contradiction, even though the (constitutional) law is pretty clear. Long story short is blacks, females, and recently gays (which are somehow a sex) are the only truly protected classes. You can screw over anyone else with impunity. If you don't like it, you're racist, sexist, or homophobic.

17
RStroud 17 points ago +17 / -0

Container ships intended to operate on the Pacific may not fit through the canal. They're usually designed with a particular route in mind. If you're not planning on going through the canal, there's no reason to design around it.

5
RStroud 5 points ago +5 / -0

That's why they use the term. Everyone loves "democracy", while most people hold a much lower opinion of the state. They're evoking a sacred myth and aligning themselves with it. This is straight out of Ellul's text on propaganda.

3
RStroud 3 points ago +3 / -0

Weird that the US (through the CIA and state department) instigated revolutions in the two countries where Russia has highly strategic naval bases. And the western media mindlessly repeated "Russia Bad!" and never put that 2 & 2 together on what was happening below the surface.

39
RStroud 39 points ago +39 / -0

Democracy is their code word for the corporate-state oligarchy, it has nothing to do with the popular will of the people.

1
RStroud 1 point ago +1 / -0

Here, there are several family names that everyone knows. They're attached to countless buildings, parks, scholarships, and foundations. They built little empires around various businesses that lasted decades. These families all sold out or went out of business in the 80s-90s. Nothing like them has replaced them.

On a more local level, our small towns mainstreets are empty shells. Where we used to have grocers, pharmacies, cafes, hardware stores, department stores, and barbers...now we have a Dollar General. There's a Walmart thirty miles away, where their "downtown" is bigger but just as empty.

The people that ran those stores, and their employees, mostly kept the money in their community. They were also members of various clubs and associations that invested in civic projects and sponsored community events. Nothing replaced these people. The prices might be lower, but the profits all get sent someplace else.

5
RStroud 5 points ago +5 / -0

We signed treaties and gave them layers of regulatory and financial incentives to leave. Very few people profited from it.

A factory's wages benefited an American town, and while the factory owner might get rich, he spent and invested his profits domestically (and largely locally). Now the factory benefits people in another country, and the profits are reinvested in building more foreign factories, or are distributed as dividends which are then invested in large corporations centered around large financial centers. With the rise of large corporate retail, they siphoned even more money away from the local economy.

This is how they gutted entire cities and countless small towns in Middle America. Look around and see who invested in the buildings and factories that are now sitting derelict and crumbling. They were the actual "middle class".

1
RStroud 1 point ago +1 / -0

It's about the same throughout the industrialized/westernized world. Globohomo, through the EU and "United" States, have made it inescapable.

1
RStroud 1 point ago +1 / -0

That's my feeling, that they'll have the people demanding someone do something. I don't think Harris or Biden have the charisma to step up as "natural leaders". I can't really point to anyone visible in the democrat party that could convincingly play a good "wartime president". So, maybe they'll have a bipartisan cabal in the senate.

21
RStroud 21 points ago +21 / -0

Worrying part is they're not clamoring to appear to fix or even mitigate the crisis they have created. They're portraying it like a force of nature, beyond prediction and out of control. The first part makes sense, but the second is atypical political behavior. That bodes I'll. I'd be very weary of the hero that emerges.

11
RStroud 11 points ago +11 / -0

Most witch trials involved tests that, regardless of outcome, could be interpreted as strong evidence for the accused being a witch.

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